Honorary Doctorate Degrees

HONORARY DOCTORATE DEGREES. AND PHD DEGREES. PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY DEGREE.

Honorary Doctorate Degrees

honorary doctorate degrees

    honorary doctorate

  • A doctorate is an academic degree or professional degree that in most countries refers to a class of degrees which qualify the holder to teach in a specific field (eg. PhD).
  • of Dimitrie Cantemir Christian University in 2009

    degrees

  • (degree) a specific identifiable position in a continuum or series or especially in a process; “a remarkable degree of frankness”; “at what stage are the social sciences?”
  • The amount, level, or extent to which something happens or is present
  • A stage in a scale or series, in particular
  • A unit of measurement of angles, one three-hundred-and-sixtieth of the circumference of a circle
  • (degree) a position on a scale of intensity or amount or quality; “a moderate grade of intelligence”; “a high level of care is required”; “it is all a matter of degree”
  • academic degree: an award conferred by a college or university signifying that the recipient has satisfactorily completed a course of study; “he earned his degree at Princeton summa cum laude”

honorary doctorate degrees – Everybody Loves

Everybody Loves Raymond: The Complete Eighth Season
Everybody Loves Raymond: The Complete Eighth Season
Standup comedian Ray Romano stars as Ray Barone, a successful sportswriter who deals with his brother and parents, who happen to live across the street. Patricia Heaton (“The Goodbye Girl”), Peter Boyle (“While You Were Sleeping”), Doris Roberts (“Remington Steele”), and Brad Garrett (“Til Death”) round out the stellar cast.
DVD Features:
3D Animated Menus
Additional Scenes
Audio Commentary
Gag Reel

A recurring theme throughout Everybody Loves Raymond’s excellent eighth season might be, “No good deed goes unpunished.” In the episode “Misery Loves Company,” annoyingly happy newlyweds Robert (Brad Garrett) and Amy (Monica Horan) offer unwanted marriage advice to Raymond (Ray Romano) and Debra (Patricia Heaton) and even in-laws Frank (Peter Boyle) and Marie (Doris Roberts), who gives them a reality check on what marriage really is (“You plow through”). In “The Ingrate,” Raymond pays tribute to Debra in his newspaper column after forgetting to acknowledge her in a speech, only to raise the ire of a resentful Marie. In “Debra at the Lodge,” Debra volunteers at Frank’s lodge, only to become an object of lust for the randy elderly members (this season, Debra begins to blossom as a suburban goddess in the grand Laura Petrie tradition).
After eight seasons, we know these characters like our own family members. So, much of each episode’s comedy is built upon our anticipation of how they will react to each other, as when Marie catches Raymond and Debra in an escalating series of lies or when the Barones share Thanksgiving with Amy’s more uptight family, who, she observes at one point, “wouldn’t yell if they were on fire.” In one of the season’s best episodes, Debra seizes on a rift between Marie and family newcomer Amy over thank-you notes to shift the balance of power from the manipulative and Machiavellian Marie (as always, a losing battle).
Raymond is one of those rare sitcoms that stayed on top of its game during its nine-year run. This penultimate season is filled with classic episodes and priceless moments. The incisive and intimately observed writing, brought to life by the peerless, Emmy-winning ensemble, could turn on a dime from funny to genuinely moving. In “Golf for It,” the season finale, Raymond and Robert pull an all-nighter waiting for a tee-time. Their conversation turns to the indomitable Marie, and which of the brothers will care for her in her dotage. Marriage, as Paul Rudd’s character observes in Knocked Up, “is like a tense, unfunny version of Everybody Loves Raymond.” But the secret to Raymond’s enduring success is that it’s funny because it’s true. –Donald Liebenson

Robert F. Kennedy receives his honorary doctorate

Robert F. Kennedy receives his honorary doctorate
Robert F. Kennedy received his honorary doctorate at UNB, Frericton, NB, Canada at the fall convocation in 1967. As a graduate student I was invited to be there. After photographing we lined up for handshakes with RFK.
According to Wikipedia
Robert Francis "Bobby" Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. He was one of President Kennedy’s most trusted advisors and worked closely with the president during the Cuban Missile Crisis. His contribution to the African-American Civil Rights Movement is sometimes considered his greatest legacy.
in early 1968 Kennedy announced his own campaign for president. It was a battle for control of the Democratic Party. Kennedy defeated McCarthy in the critical California primary, but was assassinated moments after claiming victory. On June 9, 1968,

P1040155

P1040155
Pratt Institute Commencement Ceremony. Radio City Music Hall. Manhattan, New York City. Photo courtesy of Dudley.
honorary doctorate degrees

honorary doctorate degrees

Everybody Loves Raymond: The Complete Eighth Season
Standup comedian Ray Romano stars as Ray Barone, a successful sportswriter who deals with his brother and parents, who happen to live across the street. Patricia Heaton (“The Goodbye Girl”), Peter Boyle (“While You Were Sleeping”), Doris Roberts (“Remington Steele”), and Brad Garrett (“Til Death”) round out the stellar cast.
DVD Features:
3D Animated Menus
Additional Scenes
Audio Commentary
Gag Reel

A recurring theme throughout Everybody Loves Raymond’s excellent eighth season might be, “No good deed goes unpunished.” In the episode “Misery Loves Company,” annoyingly happy newlyweds Robert (Brad Garrett) and Amy (Monica Horan) offer unwanted marriage advice to Raymond (Ray Romano) and Debra (Patricia Heaton) and even in-laws Frank (Peter Boyle) and Marie (Doris Roberts), who gives them a reality check on what marriage really is (“You plow through”). In “The Ingrate,” Raymond pays tribute to Debra in his newspaper column after forgetting to acknowledge her in a speech, only to raise the ire of a resentful Marie. In “Debra at the Lodge,” Debra volunteers at Frank’s lodge, only to become an object of lust for the randy elderly members (this season, Debra begins to blossom as a suburban goddess in the grand Laura Petrie tradition).
After eight seasons, we know these characters like our own family members. So, much of each episode’s comedy is built upon our anticipation of how they will react to each other, as when Marie catches Raymond and Debra in an escalating series of lies or when the Barones share Thanksgiving with Amy’s more uptight family, who, she observes at one point, “wouldn’t yell if they were on fire.” In one of the season’s best episodes, Debra seizes on a rift between Marie and family newcomer Amy over thank-you notes to shift the balance of power from the manipulative and Machiavellian Marie (as always, a losing battle).
Raymond is one of those rare sitcoms that stayed on top of its game during its nine-year run. This penultimate season is filled with classic episodes and priceless moments. The incisive and intimately observed writing, brought to life by the peerless, Emmy-winning ensemble, could turn on a dime from funny to genuinely moving. In “Golf for It,” the season finale, Raymond and Robert pull an all-nighter waiting for a tee-time. Their conversation turns to the indomitable Marie, and which of the brothers will care for her in her dotage. Marriage, as Paul Rudd’s character observes in Knocked Up, “is like a tense, unfunny version of Everybody Loves Raymond.” But the secret to Raymond’s enduring success is that it’s funny because it’s true. –Donald Liebenson

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